Do you have two Gods?

Question: Do you have two Gods? Light

“Since both the Father and Jesus are called God in Scripture several times, how do you answer from the Scripture if someone says: ‘Well then, you have two Gods’?”

Tennessee

Answer:

This is an excellent question, and filled with far reaching implications.

In the Bible, the word “god” has several different meanings. In a very limited sense, men are called gods. Both the Greek word theos and the Hebrew word elohim, which are most often translated “god” are used in reference to men. (See Exodus 7:1; Psalm 82:6; John 10:34) When the word “god” is used in that sense, then there are hundreds and thousands of gods.

In a less limited sense, angels are called gods. David wrote about man, “For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels [elohim].” (Psalms 8:5) The word “angels” in this verse comes from the Hebrew word elohim. The way elohim is used here it denotes a type of being that is higher than man but, it is still used in a limited sense, and with this definition there would still be many gods.

The Bible says, “To us there is but one God, the Father.” (1 Corinthians 8:6) So, to us Christians, there is only one God, the Father. If Jesus was exactly like the Father in every respect, then we would have two Gods, but He is not. Let me explain. In reference to Christ, the word “god” is used in a much less limited sense, to denote His nature as being on the same level as His Father—something that cannot be said about any other being in the universe. The Bible says that Christ was “in the form of God.” (Philippians 2:6)

But even when the word “god” is used of Christ, it is used in a limited sense, because Christ has a God who is “the head of Christ,” “above all,” and “greater than” He. (1 Corinthians 11:3; Ephesians 4:6; and John 14:28) When the word “god” is used in its absolute and unlimited sense, there is only one person to whom it can apply, and that is God, the Father, alone. Jesus said that His Father is “the only true God.” (John 17:3) Paul said, “there is none other God but one… God, the Father.” (1 Corinthians 8:4, 6) Of the 1,354 times the word “god” is used in the New Testament, more than 99% of the time it refers exclusively to God, the Father, while it only applies to His Son four times. (John 1:1; John 20:28; Hebrews 1:8; 1 Timothy 3:16)

So, to clarify, there are many gods when the word “god” is used in a limited sense, to include men and angels. When the word “god” is used as an adjective to describe the nature of God, as in John 1:1, then there are only two divine beings, God, the Father, and Jesus Christ, His only begotten Son. The Son of God is completely divine by nature because His Father is divine, just as I am completely human, because my parents are human.

When the word “God” is used in its absolute sense, to denote “the most high God,” “the sovereign of the universe,” or “the only true God,” then there is only one God; God, the Father, beside which there is no god.

I hope this helps to answer your question.

  • https://sites.google.com/site/theendtimewarning/sundayworshipsda Cindy Haynes

    “It may be objected, If the Father and the Son are two distinct beings, do you not, in worshipping the Son and calling him God, break the first commandment of the decalogue? “No; it is the Father’s will ‘That all men should honor the Son, even as they honor the Father.’ We cannot break the commandment and dishonor God by obeying him. The Fathers says of the Son, ‘Let all the angels of God worship him.’ Should angels refuse to worship the Son, they would rebel against the Father. Children inherit the name of their Father. The Son of God ‘hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than’ the angels. That name is the name of his Father. The Father says to the Son, ‘Thy throne, O God, is forever and ever.’ Heb.1. The Son is called ‘The mighty God.’ Isa. 9:6. And when he comes again to earth his waiting people will exclaim, ‘This is our God.’ Isa. 25:9.

    It is the will of the Father that we should thus honor the Son. In doing so we render supreme honor to the Father. If we dishonor the Son, we dishonor the Father; for he requires us to honor his son. “But though the Son is called God yet there is a ‘God and Father of our lord Jesus Christ’ 1Pet. 1:3. Though the Father says to the Son, ‘Thy throne, O God, is forever and ever,’ yet, that throne is given him of his Father; and because he loved righteousness and hated iniquity, he further says, ‘Therefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee.’ Heb. 1:9. ‘God hath made that same Jesus both Lord and Christ.’ Acts. 2:36. The Son is ‘the everlasting Father,’ not of himself, nor of his Father, but of his children. His language is, ‘I and the children which God hath given me.’ Heb. 2:13.” R. F. Cottrell, Review and Herald, June 1, 1869.

    • Lynnford Beachy

      Thank you for sharing those good thoughts, Sister Cindy. God bless you and your family.

  • ounbbl

    To avoid confusion and unnecessary arguments, we better have a clear definition of the word ‘to worship’.
    As to Heb 1:8 ‘Your throne, God, …’ What is referred by ‘your’? Of Son? Or of Father? Note ‘God’ is the God in Greek, meaning Elohim (i.e. Father), is in nominative. Is it used as exclamatory as ‘O God’ or appositive as ‘your throne = God’?
    A question to Trinitarians is: what does it mean if they say ‘worship Father, worship Son, and worship Spirit’ and ‘pray to Father’ ‘pray to Son’ and ‘pray to Spirit’? Howe these worships/prayers are different as to Father, Son, and Spirit?

    • Lynnford Beachy

      Good question ounbbl. Since I am not a Trinitarian, I will not attempt to answer it. Maybe someone else will answer it for us.